VILLAGE HISTORY & MEMORIALS

 

In the Hyde Parish Plan of 2005, under action E13, a Parish History Group was formed.  Building on the Millenium Project, further work was done by a wide range of people studying the history of the area, stories from local families, and the 'House Histories'. 

 

There is now a large body of historical information within the Parish and over the next few months and years this information will be posted to this website.

 

You will find that the content will especially illustrate the changes that have occurred during the  years from 1900 to 2000.  For example, in 1900:

  • people got their water from wells and used candles,

  • the majority of people could not read or write as the present village school had only just opened with education available for all,

  • the census returns for 1911 asked each household how many children they had 'that had died' and how many 'were still living', and

  • people worked as 'carters' and now we have 'pilots' living in the village. 

 

This will be an ongoing project, so if anyone has anything they wish to post – photographs, stories, and research about the people in Hyde Parish up to the year 2000 -  or would like to ‘add to ' or 'correct' the research, we would welcome contributions.

 

In the first instance please contact the Parish Clerk, Martine Coatham; whose email is parish.clerk@hyde-pc.gov.uk

 

We are starting our History pages with details concerning those members of the Parish lost in the First World War

There were 16 men from our Parish lost during the Great War.  Their names are recorded in the War Memorial Hall.

 

It is regrettable that 70% of their service records were lost during the Second World War when the building that contained them was hit by a bomb and destroyed by fire.   Therefore this information has been gathered using local knowledge from the families, Forces War Records, War Grave Commission, Census Returns and with the help of Carole and Richard at the Lyndhurst Museum. Some have been very straight forward, but others have needed a lot of 'rummaging' to pin them down.   

 

Of the men recorded on our memorial, the majority were born in the parish; it also included men who were living here at the time they enlisted. The memorial also includes men who had emigrated to Australia and Canada. 

 

Various interesting facts have emerged:-

The WITT family lost 4 sons, with 3 of them dying within 3 months of each other on the Somme in 1916. A relative told me that the brothers enlisted on the same day – this actually appears to apply to two of the brothers, whose army numbers are very close together. The Witts were not the only family to lose more then one son, the MORGAN family of Hungerford lost 2 sons.

 

The overwhelming majority fought on the Western Front with the Somme in 1916 claiming 4 lives and the 3rd Battle of Ypres (also known as Passchendaele) in 1917 claiming 5 lives. 

 

ANN SEVIER

 

                      ''Ode of Remembrance'' taken from Laurence Binyon's poem ''For the Fallen''

 

                                                     They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
                                                       Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
                                                        At the going down of the sun and in the morning,

                                                                       We will remember them

In Memory of

 

WALTER JOHN HAYWARD 'MM'

Company Sergeant Major 580

 

8th Bn. Rifle Brigade

who died on

Saturday, 26th August 1916. Aged 31.

 

The Census of 1901 records Walter living with the DYMOTT family on Gorley Green as their nephew. He was 16 years old and working as a carter on the farm. After his death his Military Medal and water bottle were sent back to Gorley. The water bottle is still in the possession of Michael HAYWARD at Green farm and the Medal went to the DYMOTT family.

 

Commemorative Information

 

HEILLY STATION CEMETERY, MERICOURT-L'ABBE

Somme, France. Grave reference III. G.7.

 

Mericourt-l'Abbé is a village 19 kilometres north east of Amiens. The 36th Casualty Clearing station was at Heilly from the 1st April 1916 to April 1917. The cemetery was begun in May 1916 and the last grave was in May 1919. There are 3,000 dead of 1914 - 1918 commemorated on this site.

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

 

Notes 

The 8th Battalion, Rifle Brigade was formed at Winchester, August 1914. It was part of ''K1'' and part of 41st Bd, 14th Division and went to France in May 1915. CSM HAYWARD received his wounds in the Somme battles, probably whilst holding the front line trenches in Delville Wood in August. The 8th Bn's participation on the Somme only began in the second week of August.

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

WILLIAM INGS 

Private 30798 

 

2nd Bn., Devonshire Regiment 

who died on 

Friday 21st September 1917. Age 22. 

 

Son of Alfred and Jane INGS of 5,Oakdale, Longfleet, Poole, Dorset. Born at a cottage, (no longer standing), in the area known as Mudmer, between Blissford and Pitts Wood. He is listed on the 1901 census as 'Willie' aged six years. His father was listed as an agricultural worker and he and his wife were born in Blissford. 'Willie' had 5 other siblings.

 

Commemorative Information

 

TYNE COT Cemetery XLIV. A. 38 

 

Tyne Cot Cemetery is 9 kilometres NE of Leper Town Centre. The memorial is to the missing in Belgian Flanders and records 35,000 officers and men whose graves are unknown. It is also the largest Commonwealth Cemetery in the world with 8,369 unidentified burials.

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

The Devonshire Regiment was on the Western Front in 1917 when the 3rd Battle of Ypres was mounted by the Commonwealth forces, with the Battle of Passchendaele from 31st July to 6th November 1917. This coincided with the heaviest rains for 30 years turning the soil into a quagmire which eventually became so deep that men and horses drowned in it. It took 3 months and 325,000 Allied casualties to take the village of Passchendaele on 4th October 1917. William is recorded with the rank of Sergeant on the village memorials. 

 

Source – work done by Ann Sevier

In Memory of 

 

CHARLES ALBERT JUPE 

Boy 1st Class J/21743 

 

H.M.S. ''Triumph'', Royal Navy 

who died on 

Tuesday, 25th May 1915. Age 17.

 

 

Son of Charles George and Elizabeth Ann JUPE, of New Street, Ringwood and native of Frogham. In the census of 1911 he was living in a five roomed cottage on Hyde Common. In the household were his Grandparents Emos and Julia GOUGE and his mother Elizabeth. He was 13 and listed as a Farm Labourer and had two younger brothers and a younger sister. 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL, Hampshire. Panel reference 8 

 

The Portsmouth Memorial register records the losses of ranks and ratings from 1914 to 1921. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

HMS ''Triumph'' was with the Dardanelles (Gallipoli) naval force from March 1915. German submarines succeeded in penetrating the Mediterranean and reached the Dardanelles area in the first half of May 1915. ''Triumph'' was torpedoed on 25th May 1915 by the German Sub 'U.21' commanded by Otto HERSING. The British ships were relying on boom defences and anti-torpedo nets to protect them against submarine attack. They proved unable to protect ''Triumph'', or the ''Majestic'' which was also sunk by U.21 two days later. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

PERCY LOCKYER 

Private 29828 

 

2nd/7th Bn., Royal Warwickshire Regiment 

who died on Friday, 5th April 1918. Age 19.

 

In the 1911 census he is listed as the son of Albert and Jane LOCKYER, of Frogham, (on Frogham Hill). He is 12 years old and still attending school and has 7 brothers and sisters. 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN, France. P. VII. B. 4B. 

 

The cemetery and extension is situated 3 kilometres south of Rouen Cathedral. The British camps and hospitals and the 3rd Echelon of General headquarters were established at Rouen. The majority of the dead were taken to St Sever and there are over 8,500 graves from the 1914 -18 war. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

Pte. LOCKYER's 2nd/7th Bn.Royal Warwicks, was part of the 61st (South Midland) Division. The 61st Division was in the front line, opposite St Quentin, when the Germans launched their great spring offensive on 21st March 1918, which they expected to win before the growing numbers of American soldiers arrived in France. The 61st Division, performed most creditably, holding on to their battle zone intact until nightfall, and inflicting heavy casualties on their attackers. However the 61st Division line gave way south of St. Quentin and the Fifth Army retreated back across the old Somme battlefields. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

HERBERT NOBLE 

Private 59190 

 

1st Garrison Bn. Devonshire Regiment 

who died on 

Sunday, 15th April 1917. Age 34.

 

On the 1911 census he is recorded as living in Hungerford and was 28 and married to Fanny (born Fordingbridge) with 2 young daughters and was working as a bricklayer. The 1901 census records him as visiting relations with the name PHILPOT in Parkstone Poole. On all the census returns he is recorded as having been born at Whiteparish. 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

MIKRA MEMORIAL, Greece 

 

Mikra memorial is 8 kilometres south of Thessaloniki. It bears the names of nurses, officers and men of the forces of the Empire who lost their lives in the Mediterranean and whose grave is the sea. The right hand side group carries the names from the ''Arcadian'' and the ''Princess Alberta''. The hired transport ''Arcadian'' was torpedoed and sunk on the 15th April 1917, 42 kilometres north east from the island of Milo (Melos) carrying reinforcements for Egypt. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

Pte. NOBLE was presumably lost at sea when ''Arcadian'' was torpedoed near Milo on 15th April 1917. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

HERBERT WITT 

Private 14996 

 

11th Bn. Hampshire Regiment 

who died on 

Wednesday 6th September 1916. Age 19. 

 

One of the 4 sons (Robert, Herbert, Alfred and Reginald) who died during the war - of Vincent & Sarah WITT of 'Windy Ridge' Abbotswell Road (the old cottage). In the 1901 census Herbert is listed as a boy of 4 years. (see other records) 

 

Commemorative Information 

THIEPVAL MEMORIAL 

Pier and Face 7C and 7B

 

This memorial designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens commemorating the Battle of the Somme and bears the names of 72,000 officers and men that have no known grave. 90% of these died between July to November 1916. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

The Hampshire Regiment was on the Somme in 1916 and Herbert was probably killed during the 1st Battle of the Somme. The 11th battalion of the Hampshire Regiment was part of the 16th (Irish Division) involved in the Battle of Guillemont 3rd to 6th September 1916. 

 

Source – work done by Ann Sevier

In Memory of 

 

ROBERT WILLIAM WITT 

Private 23309 

 

1st Bn. Hampshire Regiment 

who died on 

23rd October 1916. Age 36.

 

One of the 4 sons (Robert, Herbert, Alfred and Reginald) who died during the war - of Vincent & Sarah WITT of 'Windy Ridge' Abbotswell Road (the old cottage). In the 1901 census Robert is 21 years old and is listed as a worker at a powder manufacturer (Shultze). (see other records) 

 

Commemorative Information 

GROVE TOWN CEMETERY 

Grave Ref. 1.P.9 

 

This cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and contains 1,395 burials. Grove Town was a casualty clearing station set up to deal with the casualties from the Somme Battlefield. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes

The Hampshire Regiment was on the Somme in 1916 and Robert was killed during the 1st Battle of the Somme. The 1st battalion of the Hampshire Regiment was part of the 4th Division and was involved in the Battle of Transloy from 1st to 8th September 1916. 

 

Source – work done by Ann Sevier .

In Memory of 

 

CLIFFORD CHARLES COMPTON 

Private 4952 

 

5th (Royal Irish) Lancers 

who died on 

Tuesday, 25th May 1915. Age 20. 

 

The COMPTON family in the 1891 census was living on Abbotswell Road. The 1911 census shows, Clifford was living at Winchester with his father 'Tom' who was working as a domestic gardener and his mother Harriet. Clifford is 16 years old and working as a domestic 'boot boy'. 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

YPRES (Menin Gate), Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium Panel 5 

 

Ypres (now Leper) is a town in the province of West Flanders. The Memorial is situated at the eastern side of the town on the road to Menin and Coutrai, and bears the names of men who were lost without trace during the defence of the Ypres Salient. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

5th Lancers were Regular Cavalry of the line. They were stationed at Dublin when the war broke out and went to France in August 1914 as part of 3rd Cavalry Brigade of the Cavalry Division under command of ALLENBY. They became part of 2nd Calvary Division in September 1914, under command of GOUGH. They took part in the retreat from Mons and the battle of the Marne. In April to May 1915 they were in action during the Second Battle of Ypres, launched by the Germans on 22nd April with the first ever use of gas in warfare. The 2nd Cav. Division was in the actions around Bellewaarde Ridge (near Hooge), 24th/25th May 1915 – sometimes dismounted. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

FRANCIS GEORGE MORGAN 

Corporal 3426 

 

49th Bn. Australian Infantry, A.I.F 

who died on 

Tuesday, 19th October 1917. Died aged 27. 

 

Son of George and Mary Jane MORGAN, of Hungerford, (cottage now called Greenways), Fordingbridge. In the 1901 census his father 'George' is a farm labourer and he was 11 years old with his brother ‘Sidney', also was lost during the war, was 3 years old (see other record). 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

MENIN ROAD SOUTH MILITARY CEMETERY, 

Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium Grave III.J.8 

 

Ypres (now Leper) is a town in the province of West Flanders. The military cemetery is located 2 kilometres east of Leper town centre. The cemetery was first used in 1916 and continued until the summer of 1918 with over 1,500 casualties commemorated. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

49th (Queensland) Bn, was in 4th Australian Div. Cpl. MORGAN died during closing stages of 3rd battle of Ypres, better known as Passchendaele which lasted from 31st july to 10th November 1917. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

THOMAS EDWIN DEAR 

Stoker 2nd Class K/29232 

 

H.M.S. ''Victory'', Royal Navy 

who died on 

Saturday, 18th December 1915. Age 20. 

 

Son of Mr G.W and E.J.L. DEAR of Ogdens Farm, Fordingbridge (a new house replaces the cottage on the gravel track from Abbotswell to Ogdens). On the 1911 census 'George' the father is a farmer and 'Thomas' is listed as 15 years old and a general labourer. There are also 7 brothers and sisters listed. 

 

Commemorative Information 

Hyde (Holy Ascension) Churchyard. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

 

Notes

Stoker DEAR is one of 7 men on New Forest war memorials listed as serving on HMS. ''Victory''. 5 of them are buried in their home villages and the other 2 at Portsmouth. It is believed '' Victory'' was used as a training base for the Royal Navy. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

SYDNEY WALTER DOWNER 

Private 240888 

 

''B'' Coy. 1St/5th Bn. Welsh Regiment 

who died on 

Monday 26th March 1917. Age 23.

 

In the 1901 he is recorded as 8 years old and the son of Albert James & Helena DOWNER who are living in a cottage near the vicarage (now Hyde House) and was 8 years old. His father was working at the Schultze Gunpowder Company as a labourer. 

 

Commemorative Information

 

JERUSALEM MEMORIAL, Israel. Panels 30 to 32. 

 

The memorial stands in Jerusalem War Cemetery and is at the north end of the Mount of Olives. It commemorates over 3,000 soldiers of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force from the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa who fell in Egypt or Palestine and have no known grave. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 1/5th Bn. Welsh Reg. were Territorials. They were in Britain until July 1915, when they were posted to Gallipoli as part of 53rd Division, landing at Suvla Bay on 9th August 1915. They left Gallipoli in December and spent the remainder of the war in Palestine/Middle East as part of the 'Egyptian Expeditionary Force'. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

SIDNEY THOMAS MORGAN 

Private 44200 

 

7thBn. Lincolnshire Regiment 

who died on 

Friday, 20th September 1918. Age 20. 

 

Son of George and Mary Jane MORGAN, of Hungerford, (cottage now called Greenways), Fordingbridge. In the 1901 census his father 'George' is a farm labourer and 'Sidney' is recorded as 3 years old, and also his brother Francis 11 years (lost during the war – see other record). 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

VIS-EN-ARTOIS MEMORIAL, Pas de Calais, France Panel 4 

 

Vis-en-Artois and Haucourt are villages 10 kilometres south-east of Arras. The memorial bears the names of over 9,000 men who fell in the period from 8th August 1918 to the date of the Armistice who have no known grave. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

The 7th Bn., Lincolns were 51st Bde., 17th Division was heavily involved in the operations of September 1918 which culminated in the successful storming of the very heavily fortified Hindenburg Line. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven

In Memory of 

 

ALFRED WITT 

Private 256239 

 

1st Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion 

who died on 

Saturday 28th August 1918. Died aged 32. 

 

One of the 4 sons (Robert, Herbert, Alfred and Reginald) who died during the war - of Vincent & Sarah WITT of 'Windy Ridge' Abbotswell Road (the old cottage). In the 1901 census Alfred is 15 years old and is listed as a dairyman. (see other records) 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

AUBIGNY CEMETERY EXTENSION Pas de Calais, France Grave Ref. 1V.D.57 

 

This cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Bloomfield and contains 2,771 Commonwealth burials from the First World War. It was used by the Canadians during 1917 and 1918. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

The 8th August 1918 was the start of the Hundred Days Offensive which led to the end of the First World War and involved armoured warfare and the end of the trenches. It was the Battle of Amiens that began the offensive which involved 4 Canadian Divisions who attacked alongside the Australians with 580 tanks. 

 

Source – work done by Ann Sevier

In Memory of 

 

REGINALD WITT 

 

Private 23061 

1st Bn. Hampshire Regiment 

who died on 

Friday 8th August 1916. Died aged 36.

 

One of the 4 sons (Robert, Herbert, Alfred and Reginald) who died during the war - of Vincent & Sarah WITT of 'Windy Ridge' Abbotswell Road (the old cottage). In the 1901 census Robert is 21 years old and is listed as a worker at a powder manufacturer (Shultze). (see other records) 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

ESSEX FARM CEMETERY Leper, Belgium Grave Ref. 111.A.30 

 

This cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Bloomfield and contains 1,097 burials. Essex Farm was a dressing station dealing with the casualties from the Somme Battlefield. The cemetery was used from April 1915 to August 1917 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

The 1st Bn., Hampshire Regiment was on the Somme in 1916 and Robert was killed during the 1st Battle of the Somme. The 1st battalion of the Hampshire Regiment was part of the 4th Division and was involved in the Battle of Transloy from 1st to 8th September 1916. 

 

Source – work done by Ann Sevier

In Memory of 

 

FRANCIS SYDNEY KEITH BARTLETT 

Private 2788 

 

39th Bn. Australian Infantry, A.I.F 

who died on 

Thursday, 4th October 1917. Age 22. 

 

On the 1911 census he is recorded as the son of Alfred Isaac & Janet BARTLETT, of Frogham (Hill – cottage now called Bartletts) and he was 15 years old and working as a Farm Labourer. He had 7 other brothers and sisters. 

 

Commemorative Information 

 

YPRES (Menin Gate), Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium Panel 7 -17 - 23 - 25 - 27 - 29 - 31 

 

Ypres (now Leper) is a town in the province of West Flanders. The Memorial is situated at the eastern side of the town on the road to Menin and Coutrai, and bears the names of men who were lost without trace during the defence of the Ypres Salient. 

 

Source – Commonwealth War Graves Commission. 

 

Notes 

39th Bn. Was part of 3rd Australian Division. The Australians played a vital part in 3rd Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele) between July to November 1917. 39th Bn. was involved in the Brodseinde battle of 4th October. The Official History records them as attacking at 5.25a.m. But being held up by machine- gun fire from german pill-boxes, in the clearing of which a V.C was won by a fellow Australian of their sister-battalion, the 40th. 

 

Source – work done by Carole Standeven